Tall Claims? What You Need to Know About Car Accident Insurance Anderson SC

In theory, car accident insurance is one way to protect yourself, your car, your family, and any other passengers in the unfortunate event of an accident. In reality, car accident insurance protects drivers, provided the driver has the right amount of insurance.

Allstate - Cathy Golson
(864) 249-5060
3628A N Highway 81
Anderson, SC
Description
Safe Drivers Save 45% or More. Call Your Local Allstate Agent Today. Quick and Easy!

Allstate Auto Insurance
(888) 355-7971
1704 E Greenville St
Anderson, SC
Description
Safe Drivers Save 45% or more on Auto Insurance. Call Allstate Now!
Phone Hours
SUN - SAT 12:00AM - 12:00AM

Allstate Auto Insurance
(888) 355-7971
407 E Franklin St
Hartwell, GA
Description
Safe Drivers Save 45% or more on Auto Insurance. Call Allstate Now!
Phone Hours
SUN - SAT 12:00AM - 12:00AM

Worth Mason Insurance Agency Inc
(864) 222-2320
408 Highway 28 Bypass Suite 15
Anderson, SC
 
Nationwide Insurance Sub Agent Deloris Ashworth
(864) 231-0305
4109 Liberty Highway
Anderson, SC
 
Allstate Auto Insurance
(888) 355-7971
2307 N Main St
Anderson, SC
Description
Safe Drivers Save 45% or more on Auto Insurance. Call Allstate Now!
Phone Hours
SUN - SAT 12:00AM - 12:00AM

Allstate Auto Insurance
(888) 355-7971
102 Breazeale St
Belton, SC
Description
Safe Drivers Save 45% or more on Auto Insurance. Call Allstate Now!
Phone Hours
SUN - SAT 12:00AM - 12:00AM

Allstate - Joel Rice
(864) 810-1111
290 Applewood Center Pl Ste F
Seneca, SC
Description
Safe Drivers Save 45% or More. Call Your Local Allstate Agent Today. Quick and Easy!

Dickerson Insurance Agency
(864) 222-2525
426 Sayre Street
Anderson, SC
 
Rowland- Larry M - State Farm Insurance Agent
(864) 224-2880
2309 North Main Street
Anderson, SC
 

Tall Claims? What You Need to Know About Car Accident Insurance

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In theory, car accident insurance is one way to protect yourself, your car, your family, and any other passengers in the unfortunate event of an accident. In reality, car accident insurance protects drivers, provided the driver has the right amount of insurance. In the U.S., more than 14 percent of all motorists are uninsured. At 21-26 percent, Mississippi, Alabama, California, New Mexico, Arizona, Tennessee, and the District of Columbia have the highest percentage of uninsured motorists. At less than 10 percent, Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, New York, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, New Hampshire, South Dakota, Idaho, Utah, and New Jersey have the lowest percentage.

In addition to the millions of U.S. drivers that do not have auto insurance, millions more lack adequate amounts of auto insurance. These individuals typically carry the bare minimum liability coverages required by state laws. This is where the claims process can become quite difficult for the policyholder. Auto insurance companies are under no obligation to pay more than the coverage amounts stated in the policy. The policyholder must pay any amount above and beyond the coverage amount out of pocket.

For example, say you currently carry bare minimum coverages in the amount of 10/20/10. That’s, $10,000 of coverage for injury to one person, $20,000 of coverage for injury to two or more people per accident, and a minimum of $10,000 for property damage per accident. You currently live in a state that follows a tort system and you are found to be at fault for an accident that results in results in $16,000 in property damage, and $40,000 in medial bills for three injured parties. You also chose a $2,500 deductible to save on your auto insurance premium. This means, you will have to end up paying $2,500 before the insurance company will pay the claim, and another $26,000 out of pocket to pay for the accident.

Auto insurance companies are notorious for paying claims at a glacial pace, although nine out of ten claims are paid, once the investigative process is complete. Some of the most common reasons an auto insurance company will reject a claim during the investigative process is:

- If you are found to be negligent in the accident
- If you provided erroneous information on your application (even the slightest discrepancy can void the policy)
- If you cannot provide proof or documentation to support your claim.
- If an unnamed person was driving at the time of the accident
- If you violate as little as one condition of your policy agreement
- If your car is stolen and the insurance carrier suspects you are involved

The first step to protecting yourself against accidents is to carry adequate amounts of auto insurance. Most experts recommend carrying minimum coverages of 100/300/25, especially if you have a new car and assets such as a house or other investments to protect. To save money, inquire about safe driver discounts, good student discounts, multi-policy discounts, low mileage discounts, and discounts for safety features. If you currently carry adequate amounts of car accident auto insurance and you end up having to submit a claim, you can be successful during the process if you:

- Are current on your premium payments
- Have a police accident report – you should insist, even if the officer does not think a report is necessary.
- Provide all supporting documentation from the accident such as photos, eye witness accounts, contact information for all parties involved as well as license plate numbers, and car make, model, and year.
- Have original receipts from and documents from any repairs, medical bills, pay stubs, etc.
- Let the other parties auto insurance company know that you are filing a claim with your auto insurance company as well.
- Don’t trust your memory. Write down all of the details of the accident as soon as you are able to.
- Understand arbitration. If you think your carrier's damage settlement offer is too low, you have the right to ask your carrier for a form of arbitration to resolve the dispute.

One final note, you should contact your auto insurance company to make a claim as soon as possible -- even if you are not at fault. According to Bank Rate, Inc. (est. 1976), “although the other party may be at fault, you should file the claim with your own insurance carrier. Each carrier is obliged to protect the interests of its own insured, making your claim a secondary concern for the other party's carrier. Chances are you'll get the service you need more readily from your own carrier.”

Find more information about how to navigate the auto insurance claims process.