Hardwood Flooring Removing Spartanburg SC

One of the best methods we've found for removing old hardwood flooring is in a well-illustrated article from Popular Mechanics , by Alex Hutchinson. Alex says, "Old-growth wood – typically, Douglas fir, oak, and maple — has higher density and fewer defects than new wood, and often comes in lengths of 12 ft.

Milan Hardwood Flooring
(866) 383-8678
709 W Main St
Spartanburg, SC
 
Frontier Flooring
(864) 576-0700
861 Falling Creek Rd
Spartanburg, SC
 
Regal Distributing Co Inc
(864) 585-6433
2034 N Church Street Pl
Spartanburg, SC
 
Floorcrafts Mohawk Color Center
(864) 578-5761
3124 Boiling Springs Rd
Boiling Springs, SC
 
Poteats Floor Sanding
(864) 579-0600
111 Cowpens Line
Spartanburg, SC
 
Medlin Floor Service
(864) 582-8202
179 Watkins Ct
Spartanburg, SC
 
Greer Flooring Center
(864) 573-6376
201 E Blackstock Rd
Spartanburg, SC
 
Dur-A-Flex Inc
(864) 814-1730
200 Grace Dr
Boiling Springs, SC
 
Freda Flooring Systems Inc
(864) 814-3890
5977 Parris Bridge Rd
Chesnee, SC
 
Walk On Wood Floor Sanding Refinishing & Floor Laying
(864) 439-1442
265 Millwood Ln
Wellford, SC
 

Hardwood Flooring Removing

Provided by: 
Find contractors for kitchens, baths, additions, window replacement and more...

Salvaging your hardwood flooring can prove to be cost effective.

You might ask why would you ever want to remove hardwood flooring, as prized as it is by most homeowners. There are numerous reasons, including salvaging old hardwood flooring from a property that's about to be demolished or totally remodeled.

One of the best methods we've found for removing old hardwood flooring is in a well-illustrated article from Popular Mechanics , by Alex Hutchinson. Alex says, "Old-growth wood – typically, Douglas fir, oak, and maple — has higher density and fewer defects than new wood, and often comes in lengths of 12 ft. or more, which you won't find at a big-box store. Salvaging it from an old home takes time but saves money; boards wider than the standard 2 1/4-in. strips are particularly valuable." The 1-2-3 step process he describes goes as follows:

  • Step 1: Pry up the first few boards to give yourself room to work. Alternatively, use a circular saw with a carbide-tooth blade to make a plunge cut along the length of the sacrificial board, and use a pry bar to tear it out.
  • Step 2: Working from the tongue side, use a pry bar to gently lift the adjacent board up and out in the direction of the nail in order to avoid breaking off the groove. Work your way down the length of the board with the pry bar, rather than trying to remove it in one go.
  • Step 3: Pull any remaining nails from the salvaged wood using large locking pliers. Then carefully patrol the subfloor an...

Read the full article in the CalFinder Remodeling and Home Solar Power Magazine