Hardwood Flooring Removing Greenville SC

One of the best methods we've found for removing old hardwood flooring is in a well-illustrated article from Popular Mechanics , by Alex Hutchinson. Alex says, "Old-growth wood – typically, Douglas fir, oak, and maple — has higher density and fewer defects than new wood, and often comes in lengths of 12 ft.

Jimmy Johnsons Hardwood Floors
(864) 420-1888
26 W Mountain View Ave
Greenville, SC
 
Greenville Terrazzo Company Inc
(864) 295-1807
218 N Washington Ave
Greenville, SC
 
Ceramco Flooring Company
(864) 292-3833
1341 Rutherford Rd
Greenville, SC
 
Palmetto Hardwood Flooring
(864) 419-1674
2422 Laurens Rd
Greenville, SC
 
Price Floors And Cabinets
(864) 422-0061
1120 W Butler Rd
Greenville, SC
 
Distinctive Wood Floors
(864) 268-9663
230 Lofty Ridge Rd Ste A
Greenville, SC
 
Custom Flooring Installation Inc
(864) 234-7711
8 Progress Rd
Greenville, SC
 
Jimmy Johnson's Hardwood Floors, LLC
(864) 640-4279
26 West Mountainview Avenue
Greenville, SC
 
Floors Unlimited
(864) 232-3131
1306 Buncombe St
Greenville, SC
 
Southern Flooring Inc
(864) 277-8238
6820 Augusta Rd
Greenville, SC
 

Hardwood Flooring Removing

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Salvaging your hardwood flooring can prove to be cost effective.

You might ask why would you ever want to remove hardwood flooring, as prized as it is by most homeowners. There are numerous reasons, including salvaging old hardwood flooring from a property that's about to be demolished or totally remodeled.

One of the best methods we've found for removing old hardwood flooring is in a well-illustrated article from Popular Mechanics , by Alex Hutchinson. Alex says, "Old-growth wood – typically, Douglas fir, oak, and maple — has higher density and fewer defects than new wood, and often comes in lengths of 12 ft. or more, which you won't find at a big-box store. Salvaging it from an old home takes time but saves money; boards wider than the standard 2 1/4-in. strips are particularly valuable." The 1-2-3 step process he describes goes as follows:

  • Step 1: Pry up the first few boards to give yourself room to work. Alternatively, use a circular saw with a carbide-tooth blade to make a plunge cut along the length of the sacrificial board, and use a pry bar to tear it out.
  • Step 2: Working from the tongue side, use a pry bar to gently lift the adjacent board up and out in the direction of the nail in order to avoid breaking off the groove. Work your way down the length of the board with the pry bar, rather than trying to remove it in one go.
  • Step 3: Pull any remaining nails from the salvaged wood using large locking pliers. Then carefully patrol the subfloor an...

Read the full article in the CalFinder Remodeling and Home Solar Power Magazine