Hardwood Flooring Removing Anderson SC

One of the best methods we've found for removing old hardwood flooring is in a well-illustrated article from Popular Mechanics , by Alex Hutchinson. Alex says, "Old-growth wood – typically, Douglas fir, oak, and maple — has higher density and fewer defects than new wood, and often comes in lengths of 12 ft.

Anderson Mills Development Group
(864) 261-0850
354 Railroad Cir
Anderson, SC
 
Palmetto Hardwood Company
(864) 224-2973
130 Powell Rd
Anderson, SC
 
Anderson Custom Floors
(864) 261-7072
167 Hurricane Rd
Anderson, SC
 
Aps Flooring & Supply Incorporated
(864) 303-2399
5531 Highway 81 N
Williamston, SC
 
Tri-State Liquidators
(864) 847-5258
N Highway 29
Williamston, SC
 
Anderson Tile & Carpet Center Inc
(864) 226-6018
1109 Whitehall Rd
Anderson, SC
 
Ashley Wood Flooring Services Incorporated
(864) 225-0160
700 N Main St
Anderson, SC
 
Hollidays Flooring
(864) 338-5466
204 N Main St
Belton, SC
 
Upstate Hardwood And Supply
(864) 847-5000
100 Twenty Nine Ct
Williamston, SC
 
Aaron Alexander Floor Sanding
(864) 363-1903
14 Four Leaf Ct
Pelzer, SC
 

Hardwood Flooring Removing

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Salvaging your hardwood flooring can prove to be cost effective.

You might ask why would you ever want to remove hardwood flooring, as prized as it is by most homeowners. There are numerous reasons, including salvaging old hardwood flooring from a property that's about to be demolished or totally remodeled.

One of the best methods we've found for removing old hardwood flooring is in a well-illustrated article from Popular Mechanics , by Alex Hutchinson. Alex says, "Old-growth wood – typically, Douglas fir, oak, and maple — has higher density and fewer defects than new wood, and often comes in lengths of 12 ft. or more, which you won't find at a big-box store. Salvaging it from an old home takes time but saves money; boards wider than the standard 2 1/4-in. strips are particularly valuable." The 1-2-3 step process he describes goes as follows:

  • Step 1: Pry up the first few boards to give yourself room to work. Alternatively, use a circular saw with a carbide-tooth blade to make a plunge cut along the length of the sacrificial board, and use a pry bar to tear it out.
  • Step 2: Working from the tongue side, use a pry bar to gently lift the adjacent board up and out in the direction of the nail in order to avoid breaking off the groove. Work your way down the length of the board with the pry bar, rather than trying to remove it in one go.
  • Step 3: Pull any remaining nails from the salvaged wood using large locking pliers. Then carefully patrol the subfloor an...

Read the full article in the CalFinder Remodeling and Home Solar Power Magazine