Causes of Variegation Greenville SC

I’m curious—what makes certain plants have variegated leaves? Is this an adaptation for survival, the way cactus features are or the way flowers are built to appeal to pollinators? People in Greenville who have this kind of question can read on and find the answer.

Pittman Discount Building Supply
(864) 220-1900
4912 White Horse Rd
Greenville, SC
 
Marsh and Sons
(864) 271-7173
1220 Taylors Rd.
Greenville, SC
 
rafael salamanca
(864) 907-6768
1013 BOLLING SPRINGS RD
GREENVILLE, SC
Services
instaltion siding
Prices and/or Promotions
estimate free

Garner Johnson Builders
(864) 363-4841
117 Fairlane Drive
Simpsonville, SC
 
JOCANA PAINTING,LLC
(864) 561-5967
235 MILKY WAY
GREER, SC
 
Engineered Products
(864) 234-4765
355 Woodruff Rd
Greenville, SC
 
Marsh and Sons
(864) 921-0937
1220 Taylors Rd.
Taylors, SC
 
natural enhancements home and landscape improvements
(864) 306-0034
294 rivers edge drive
easley, SC
 
GS Mechanical Heating & A/C
(864) 848-3562
257 N Rutherford Rd
Greer, SC
 
Houston Grading and Hauling
(864) 884-7203
PO box 707
easley, SC
Services
grading hauling demolition clearing asphalt millings gravel topsoil
Prices and/or Promotions
call for a free estimate

Causes of Variegation

Provided by:

I’m curious—what makes certain plants have variegated leaves? Is this an adaptation for survival, the way cactus features are or the way flowers are built to appeal to pollinators?



Answer: Variation in leaf color arises because of a lack of the green pigment chlorophyll in some of the plant cells. It isn’t an adaptation to the environment, but instead it is usually the result of a cell mutation, and can be inherited (genetic) or occur randomly (chimeric). If genetic, the color change is stable, which means that if you propagate a green shoot from a plant with colored leaves or sow its seed, the coloring will reappear in the new plant. This applies both to green leaves with irregular markings (variegation), say in white and yellow, and to those of a single solid color such as gold or purple.



A random mutation usually shows up as variegation. If you propagate from a green shoot or sow seed of the plant, the color will not recur. This kind of variegation is the most common, but is often difficult to stabilize. Propagation must be from variegated or colored shoots. In nature these forms usually die out, being weaker growers because of the lack of chlorophyll, which plants use to make the food they need for growth.



Variegation can also be the result of a viral infection, showing as discolored veins or leaf areas. This form of variegation is relatively rare, but it is stable. Lonicera japonica ‘Aureoreticulata’ has this type of variegation, with golden yellow veins netting the leaves.



Read more Q&A


From Horticulture Magazine